Author Topic: Demise of the English language  (Read 121 times)

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Alsatian

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Demise of the English language
« on: December 09, 2020, 10:43:09 AM »
It is with deep regret that I have to report the passing of our native language.

For a number of years we've had 'Americanisms' creeping in, but it's now started to creep into so called professional circles.

I refer to the 'Derbyshire Times' app
This morning a headline with the word 'license' (instead of the correct 'licence' ) appeared, was it a typo - no, it also appeared in the body of the article. I suspect the spell check had been set to English US rather than English UK. However you'd have thought that a proof reader (if they still have them?) would have spotted that.

Also the Obituary column often has grammatical errors aplenty, including incorrect repeating of words, along with the cardinal sin of cutting the deceased person's head off the photo!

I can't say if the physical copy of the paper has the same errors, as I refuse to pay the high price of it, so I just use the android app.

RIP the English language.
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Sorastro

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Re: Demise of the English language
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2020, 11:56:30 AM »
I entirely agree.

The thing that really sets my teeth on edge is how the spoken [English] language has been so distorted as to be almost unrecognisable in many cases...."innit"
You only have to look at "text speak"  that's not even close it's gibberish! C U L8R.
No one can seem to string a sentence together now without using expletives, I swear {have done for years} but there's a time and a place.
 Another thing is O.K. maybe it's me, but at least I can sit down and physically write a letter to someone, I may not have all the Apostrophes and Exclamation marks as they should be but the letter could be understood, I doubt anyone under the age of 30 has ever written a letter or received one or been shown how to write one, yes I realise that nowadays there's little need but it makes me wonder what's being taught in our schools.

It's the same when "young" people are on these quiz shows. The idea is that, when you apply to go on, you are able to answer questions on a variety of subjects, no one is expecting them to be a brain boxes, I'm CERTAINLY not no where near but they should have a Modicum of intelligence unfortunately if the answers don't contain the words Adele, Kardashian  or Gucci they are at a loss.
After the nuclear war the only creatures roaming the earth will be cockroaches and politicians

Alsatian

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Re: Demise of the English language
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2020, 12:06:03 PM »
It's perfectly fine to use a computer to communicate, or a calculator to add up etc but, if you don't know the basics (eg grammar/spelling/mental arithmetic), then how do you know that the output is correct?
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Old Cruser

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Re: Demise of the English language
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2020, 12:13:50 PM »
I recently read a post with the incorrect spelling of Licence it also had an s instead of a c. I just put it down to incorrect spelling of the poster but your post explains it.
Also the prediction text are a pain in the butt so I've turned mine off !!
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smithy266

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Re: Demise of the English language
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2020, 03:23:12 PM »
I get frustrated by the number of BBC journalists who are forever putting the word 'only' in the wrong place in sentences. David Attenborough, despite his upbringing and posh accent is the same.

 

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